This is an overview of RCMP (Newfoundland and Labrador)'s social media activity. Use the tabs above to view each source in detail.

Twitter

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    Impaired driving is the leading criminal cause of death on Canada's roads. Drive sober. #RCMPNL #nltraffic https://t.co/kbTj9tOMph
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    Man and woman charged in Stephenville Armed Robbery #RCMPNL https://t.co/iuj7By7LKQ
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    #RCMPNL release impaired driving statistics for National Impaired Driving Day https://t.co/ndfa3Qo450 #nltraffic
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    Bonavista #RCMPNL investigating theft of outboard motor https://t.co/ssxDv5gPia
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    Hopedale residents charged with Bootlegging https://t.co/AJzZVRZ57H
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    Search continues for missing Natuashish teen, Kirby Mistenapeo On April 21, 2016 at approximately 9:30 a.m., the RCMP in Natuashish, N.L. was advised that 17-year-old Kirby Mistenapeo had not returned home the night before. Natuashish RCMP have been working on a ground and air search for the teen with community volunteers, Joint Rescue Coordination Centre (JRCC), Fire & Emergency Services NL, Goose Bay Search and Rescue, Hopedale Search and Rescue and the Labrador District Police Dog Services Unit. All buildings and open areas in the community have been searched as well as a five kilometre square area surrounding Natuashish. Adverse weather has delayed the search today, April 25 but as the weather improves, searchers will next focus on a valley south of the community that links Natuashish with the Sango Bay area as well as the abandoned community of Davis Inlet. Anyone with information on the whereabouts of Kirby Mistenapeo is asked to contact the Natuashish RCMP at 709-478-8900. Information can also be provided anonymously through Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), text TIP190 + your message to 'CRIMES' (274637), or by Secure Web Tips at www.nlcrimestoppers.com. PLEASE SHARE
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    Lewisporte RCMP Help Launch Bullying Prevention Program for Local School On March 4, 2016, Lewisporte RCMP officer, Cst. André Sparkes, with Lewisporte Academy students, faculty and staff as well as local residents, launched WITS, a bullying and conflict resolution program. Lewisporte Academy is now one of seven schools to join the program in the province and Cst. Sparkes hopes it will continue to spread. WITS stands for Walk away, Ignore, Talk it out, and Seek help. Cst. Sparkes presented to children in Kindergarten to Grade Three and read Walrus’s Gift, which reinforced the WITS theme, showing children how they can seek help from others when faced with conflict or bullying. The Officer then taught the students how to stand at attention, salute, and give the secret WITS Handshake and Password. Cst. Sparkes then swore the students in as WITS Special Constables, having the students repeat the WITS Oath: “I promise to use my WITS, to walk away, ignore, talk it out and seek help when I’m dealing with teasing and bullying. I promise to also help other kids use their WITS to keep my school and my community a safe and fun place to be and learn.” Cst. SPARKES has helped launch the program in three other central Newfoundland schools, as well as schools in Nova Scotia. The program is presently in hundreds of schools across the country and Cst. Sparkes hopes even more schools in Atlantic Canada continue to adopt this very well received program. The W.I.T.S. program also has a component geared towards Grades 4-6, called the L.E.A.D.S. which stands for Look and listen, Explore points of view, Act, Did it work, and Seek help. Lewisporte Academy has started with the Primary portion of the program first and hopes to also launch the LEADS portion next fall. The goal of WITS is to create responsive communities that actively work to prevent peer victimization and bullying in their homes, schools and communities. The Program teaches children in Kindergarten to Grade 3 to make safe and positive choices when faced with peer conflict. The WITS acronym provides a common language that children and the adults in their environments can use to talk about and respond to peer victimization. Now that the program has been launched, the Lewisporte Academy faculty will begin teaching the various in-class lessons based upon popular children’s books. The RCMP will check in with students and monitor the program’s progress.
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    NL RCMP recognize behind-the-scenes first responders during National Public Safety Telecommunications Week April 11, 2016 (St. John’s, N.L.) – April 10 -16, 2016 is National Public Safety Telecommunications Week, dedicated to recognizing the important work of telecommunications operators across Canada. In 2015, more than 17,000 calls were made to the Newfoundland and Labrador RCMP’s Operational Communications Centre including reports of traffic collisions and impaired drivers. These operators assess each call by asking a series of questions that help them dispatch the appropriate emergency response. For each call, operators also keep track of the responding officer’s status, ensuring the officer’s safety and that they have the resources they need to respond to the call. “If you’re dealing with an emergency situation, a calm professional voice on the other end of the phone line can give comfort that help is on the way,” said Sgt. Wayne Newell, manager of the RCMP’s Newfoundland and Labrador Operational Communications Centre. “Our operators receive rigorous training to ensure they are able to deal with the challenging situations that they encounter every day.” The Newfoundland and Labrador RCMP’s Operational Communications Centre is a partner in the NL 911 system across the province along with the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary, fire departments and the four regional health authorities. “For first responders on scene, telecommunications operators are invaluable. This week is a great opportunity for us to recognize their role as behind-the-scenes first responder,” said Sgt. Newell. Newfoundland and Labrador RCMP’s Operational Communications Centre receives many non-emergency, nuisance and abandoned calls each day. These represent precious time lost that could have been spent on real emergencies. Remember: - Only call 911 if someone’s health, safety or property is in jeopardy or if a crime is in progress. - If you call 911 by mistake, stay on the line and let the operator know - Lock your phone properly to avoid “pocket dials” to 911 - Use non-emergency phone numbers for your local RCMP, RNC or other police of jurisdiction. When there is an emergency and you’re on the phone with an operator or dispatcher, you will be asked: - Location of the emergency with address, cross streets and landmarks - Personal information, your name, address, call back number and date of birth - Details of the emergency and description of possible suspects or vehicles Learn more about the Province-wide 911 service: nl911.ca
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