Nov 6th

Oct 30th

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionJoin us via live webcast on November 2-5 for the relicensing hearing of OPG’s Darlington Nuclear Generating Station. The Commission will be considering over 280 interventions from First Nations, the public and stakeholders. The webcast will be available at nuclearsafety.gc.ca.

Oct 29th

Oct 26th

Oct 23rd

Oct 21st

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionThe CNSC is in Seoul, South Korea to participate in the 3rd International Symposium on the System of Radiological Protection presented by the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) #ICRP2015. The work of the ICRP helps to prevent cancer and other diseases and effects associated with exposure to ionising radiation, and to protect the environment. icrp.org/index.asp The CNSC actively participates in such events and works closely with international organizations like the ICRP to ensure Canada’s nuclear safety standards are among the world’s best.

Oct 20th

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionMaria Göeppert Mayer was a German-American theoretical physicist. After graduating from the University of Göttingen Maria wrote on the theory of two-photon absorption by atoms, years later her theory was verified and today the unit of measurement for the two-photon absorption cross section is named after her, the Göeppert Mayer (GM). Maria continued her research in #nuclearphysics for many years, often working in unpaid positions due to her gender. Maria went on to develop a mathematical model for the structure of nuclear shells, alongside J. Hans D. Jensen and Eugene Wigner, for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1963; making Maria the second woman ever to win a Nobel Prize. #womenhistory

Oct 19th

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionKeep an eye out for CNSC staff from October 19 to 23, 2015, as they will be out taking samples of the soil, water, air, sand and foodstuffs around the Darlington Nuclear Generation Station, located in Clarington, on the north shore of Lake Ontario. CNSC staff are performing routine testing under the Independent Environmental Monitoring Program bit.ly/1CKPJt3. This program verifies that public health and the environment around licensed nuclear facilities are safe, and that licensees’ programs are working as they should. Ontario Power Generation owns and is licensed to operate the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, and also operates a nuclear waste management facility at the station.

Oct 16th

Oct 15th

Oct 9th

Oct 8th

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionThe 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics has been jointly awarded to a Canadian named Arthur B. McDonald and Takaaki Kajita of Japan. Dr. McDonald and Dr. Kajita won the prestigious award for their discovery of neutrino alternations bit.ly/1WKqbHh, which proves that neutrinos have mass. Neutrinos are subatomic particles produced by the decay of radioactive elements, and had been previously believed to be massless. Mr. McDonald says the discovery “has changed our understanding of the innermost workings of matter.” Mr. Mcdonald conducted his research at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNOLAB), an underground observatory built into a 2-kilometre-deep abandoned mine. The SNOLAB detector is the size of a 10-storey building and held 1,100 tons of heavy water (licensed by the CNSC), which was loaned from #AECL and #OPG. The heavy water was held in a flask that floated in ordinary water. Between the observatory walls and the flask were hundreds of photomultiplier tubes, which were used to detect the “light” produced by the solar neutrinos. Heavy water is now returned to the owners and the licensee holds a CNSC licence to operate a neutron generator that is used to produce small quantities of isotopes in order to calibrate the photomultiplier tubes. Watch this Introduction to the Science of SNOLAB vide bit.ly/1P0iPOEo to learn more about the CNSC-licensed SNOLAB.

Oct 7th

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionOur team is in #ElliotLake, #Ontario, today to meet community members and discuss the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (#NWMO) site selection process to host a deep geologic repository for the long-term management of #Canadas used nuclear fuel ow.ly/T8Iby. At these meetings, our team usually answers common questions on used nuclear fuel bit.ly/1OYKX4B, its transportation, our role in regulating DGR projects bit.ly/1qnO4c3, and our research efforts bit.ly/1jn4MyB. This evening's information session in Elliot Lake will be held from 6 to 8 pm at the White Mountain Building Atrium located at 99 Spine Road (P5A 3S9).
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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionRemembering Dr. Alan Theodore Prince - We were saddened to learn of the death of Dr. Alan Theodore Prince, who was at the helm of the Atomic Energy Control Board (the CNSC’s predecessor) from 1975 to 1978. Dr. Prince received his B.A. and M.A. from the University of Toronto. He did his doctoral studies at the University of Chicago. After graduation, he worked at the National Research Council in Ottawa and various federal agencies in roles of increasing responsibility before joining the AECB for three years – a deceptively short period of time given the events that occurred. During this time, communication with the Canadian public became an AECB priority, which remains central to the CNSC today. The AECB placed renewed importance on the nuclear sector’s accountability for its decisions. Consequently, The Nuclear Liability Act came into force, the Canadian Safeguards Support Program was initiated, the Nuclear Control and Administration Act was tabled in the House of Commons, and radioactive contamination cleanup initiatives were implemented. Towards the end of his term, Prince faced a challenge that surpassed anything else associated with this defining era in the history of Canada’s nuclear sector. On January 24, 1978, a nuclear-powered Soviet surveillance satellite, COSMOS 954, re-entered the atmosphere, scattering radioactive debris across a 124,000 km2 expanse in the Northwest Territories. Continue reading: http://goo.gl/1fCmVh

Oct 6th

Oct 5th

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionRemembering Dr. Richard Osborne - On Tuesday September 29, 2015, the nuclear community lost Dr. Richard Osborne, a pioneer of radiation protection and health physics. Dr. Osborne was the founding president and the driving force behind the constitution of the Canadian Radiation Protection Association (CRPA) and its incorporation into the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) as an associate society in 1979. His career spanned over 35 years, from Research Officer to Director of Health Sciences at the Chalk River Laboratories, when he joined Atomic Energy of Canada Limited in 1963. Dr. Osborne was an exemplary scholar and advocate for radiation protection. He was the first recipient of the CRPA’s Founders Award in 1989 and received the prestigious Sievert Award from IRPA, made in recognition of outstanding contributions to radiological protection, in 2012. Dr. Osborne’s illustrious career is highlighted in his IRPA profile: http://www.irpa.net/page.asp?id=54329. As the pioneer of the CRPA, his legacy within the radiation protection community in Canada and abroad will not be forgotten. Details of the funeral arrangements can be found in his obituary http://bit.ly/1MUfIEy

Oct 2nd

Oct 1st

Sep 30th

Sep 29th

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionFollowing a public hearing, the CNSC announced today its decision to renew Nordion Inc.’s nuclear substance processing operating licence. Nordion is a health science company that processes radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications. The licence will be valid from November 1, 2015 until October 31, 2025. Transcripts of the hearing are available on the CNSC website at nuclearsafety.gc.ca, or by contacting the CNSC. The webcast of the hearing is archived on the same site for a period of 90 days. To learn more about Noridon Inc. visit their website: http://www.nordion.com/

Sep 28th

Sep 26th

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission#Throwback to this day, September 26, in 1946 when General Andrew G.L. McNaughton was appointed the first President of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB – the CNSC’s predecessor). General McNaughton was a highly accomplished engineer, commander of the First Canadian Infantry Division in the UK, as well as president of the National Research Council of Canada. He served as the AECB’s president until 1948. Learn more about General McNaughton’s accomplishments in engineering, politics and diplomacy. #CNSCPresident #CanadianHistory

Sep 25th

Sep 23rd

Sep 22nd

Sep 18th

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionWe have published the Independent Environmental Monitoring Program (IEMP) 2014 results for Key Lake mill bit.ly/1Kmx5eh and McArthur River mine bit.ly/1Ln1RHZ, both located in northern Saskatchewan. Cameco Corporation is licensed by the CNSC to operate both uranium mine and mill sites. The results confirm that the public and the environment around both sites are protected from releases from the facilities, and that no health impacts are expected. The CNSC has implemented the IEMP to verify that the public and the environment around licensed nuclear facilities are safe. As a complement to ongoing compliance activities, the program helps to confirm the CNSC’s regulatory position and decision making.

Sep 17th

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionEarlier today, CNSC Executive Vice-President and Chief Regulatory Operations Officer Ramzi Jammal spoke at the 59th International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conference in Vienna, Austria. Read his presentation: http://bit.ly/1FjuqFk The CNSC was a contributor to the IAEA Director General’s report, The Fukushima Daiichi Accident, and its five technical volumes, released on August 31, 2015. As co-chair of the working group for Technical Volume 1/5, Description and Context of the Accident, Mr. Jammal spoke about key events that happened before, during and after the accident. Read the IAEA Director General’s report on the Fukushima Daiichi accident, including the technical volumes: http://bit.ly/1PIgyoj

Sep 16th

Sep 15th

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionCitizens living on or around the #Lepreau Peninsula, 40 km southwest of Saint John, #NewBrunswick, might see CNSC staff collecting air, water, soil, vegetation and foodstuff samples near the Point Lepreau Generating Station, from September 15 to 17, 2015. This routine testing is done under the CNSC’s Independent Environmental Monitoring Program http://bit.ly/1CKPJt3. This program verifies that public health and the environment around licensed nuclear facilities are safe, and that licensees’ nuclear safety programs are working as they should. New Brunswick Power Nuclear owns and is licensed to operate the Point Lepreau Generating Station http://bit.ly/1KQyfUP. It also operates a nuclear waste management facility at the station.

Sep 14th

Sep 11th

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionToday, we launched annual fundraising campaign ! Our target this year: $195,000. In the last 5 years, we've raised $1,098,600 to support charities in our communities. #RadiatingHope #GCWCC #iGive #DYK? The Government of Canada Workplace Charitable Campaign (GCWCC) is the largest and most successful workplace fundraising campaign in #Canada. Last year, federal workers and retirees helped improve the quality of life of people living in communities across the country by giving $34.2 million.

Sep 10th

Sep 9th

Sep 4th

Sep 2nd

Sep 1st

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionAn important part of the #CNSCs mission is contributing to global #nuclear safety by ensuring that nuclear substances are used only for peaceful purposes. A key part of this is global management of the threats posed by chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (#CBRN) substances. Radiological materials tend to cause public anxiety and worry, even when safety is not an issue. A CBRN emergency can involve a complex set of risk factors and substances. First responders must know how to assess these risks and communicate skillfully with the public to mitigate fear and disruption. CNSC technical specialists provide training to first responders and support for nuclear or radiological emergencies. Read this feature article to learn more!

Aug 28th

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    Canadian Nuclear Safety CommissionThe void coefficient of reactivity – not exactly your dinner table discussion topic, and chances are you’ve never heard of it. What’s important to know is that it is a well-known characteristic that is understood by the #CNSC. In #NuclearEngineering, all nuclear reactors have a void coefficient of reactivity – which is the increase or decrease in the rate of fission that would occur, and heat generation, following a loss of coolant. In some reactors, such as pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors, this coefficient is negative. This means that the level of energy and heat produced by a reactor following a loss of coolant would naturally decrease before shutdown. In CANDU reactors, the void coefficient of reactivity is positive. So how do CANDU reactors ensure safety? A CNSC expert explains.

Aug 27th

Aug 26th

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